Trump to Sign Order Sweeping Away Obama-Era Climate Policies

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scientificamerican.com | Mar 28 @ 10:15

The Clean Power Plan would have required states to collectively cut carbon emissions from power plants by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. Trump campaigned on a promise to sweep aside green regulations he said hurt the economy, and vowed to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord. "We're going to go in a different direction," a senior White House official told reporters ahead of Tuesday's order. "Trump will sign the order at the EPA with the agency's Administrator Scott Pruitt, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Energy Secretary Rick Perry on Tuesday afternoon. Since being elected, however, he has been mum on the Paris deal and the executive order does not address it.

A desert researcher shares his essential survival gear

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popsci.com | Mar 28 @ 10:06

For a day’s work, he’ll bring four to five liters in reusable vessels in a cooler full of ice. Acharya drinks from the tap when it’s safe, and bottled or purified when he’s not accustomed to the local aquatic flora.

Of Mice and Men: Study Pushes Rodents' Home Invasion to 15,000 Years Ago

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scientificamerican.com | Mar 28 @ 10:00

In effect, you had to have a farm, not just a house, before mice moved in to raid the stored grain. The pioneering Israeli archaeozoologist Eitan Tchernov excavated many of them beginning in the 1950s, and he saw enough evidence even then to theorize about the unexpected abundance of house mice in hunter–gatherer settlements. The standard thinking until now has been that the house mouse, Mus musculus, only began its intimate relationship with humans at the dawn of agriculture, roughly 11,500 years ago. Even though the new study is limited to mice, co-author Fiona Marshall of Washington University in Saint Louis speculates house cats might also have begun their relationship with humans in the preagricultural period. In any case, the abundance of musculus specimens during periods of human occupation, the co-authors wrote, indicates musculus effectively outcompeted macedonius.

The Download, Mar 28, 2017: AI Speed Boost, Musk’s Mind Meld, and Cellular Computers

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technologyreview.com | Mar 28 @ 09:56

Elon Musk’s Plan to Help Humans Remain RelevantAs robots learn faster than ever, humans will need new ways to keep up. A Speedy Way for Robots to Teach ThemselvesMachine learning could get far faster. The hottest way to have robots teach themselves right now is called reinforcement learning, and it allowed DeepMind to topple the complex game of Go last year. In fact, the great man reckons, perhaps the only way for humans to avoid engineering their own obsolescence is to find a way to meld mind with machine. Our own Tom Simonite explains how OpenAI's so-called evolution strategies can help software learn some activities in minutes, rather than hours.

Planet-Sized "Waves" Spotted in the Sun's Atmosphere

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scientificamerican.com | Mar 28 @ 09:45

The brightpoint clusters moved westward faster than underlying portions of the solar atmosphere, which is a hallmark of Rossby waves, McIntosh notes. Huge ripples in Earth’s atmosphere called Rossby waves help to steer the planet's jet streams and weather patterns. Monitoring the Sun’s weather patterns and understanding their origins are vital to boosting the accuracy of space weather predictions to protect our technological society, they say. Rossby waves were discovered in Earth’s atmosphere in the late 1930s. The team’s findings are the first strong evidence for Rossby waves on the Sun, says Mihalis Mathioudakis, an astrophysicist at Queen’s University Belfast, UK.

What the frack is in fracking fluid?

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popsci.com | Mar 28 @ 09:42

Over 100 billion gallons—that’s how much fluid fracking wells inject into the U.S. each year. MethanolAn alcohol often found in antifreeze that serves to winterize fracking fluid. Although scientists have linked individual cases of contamination to fracking, a 2016 EPA report on its safety was inconclusive. Like Coca-Cola’s formula, these chemical cocktails are trade secrets, so it can be hard for scientists to gauge risk. These chemical cocktails are trade secrets, so it can be hard for scientists to gauge risk.

Mathematicians predict delaying school start times won't help sleep deprived teenagers

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 28 @ 09:32



Novel drug delivery beats swine flu at gene level

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 28 @ 09:32



Cortisol excess hits natural DNA process and mental health hard

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 28 @ 09:31



New 5G transmitter 20 times more efficient than the previous ones

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 28 @ 09:31



“They said I was peri-menopausal. It’s a miracle I got pregnant”

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newscientist.com | Mar 28 @ 09:02

It’s a girl.”Read more about the experimental treatment WS and more than a hundred other women have tried. Doctors told WS that her levels of a hormone called AMH, which is released by eggs, were way below normal. “To me, it’s a miracle I got pregnant. Bentom Wyemji/EyeEm/Alamy“The doctor said I was peri-menopausal,” says WS, who would prefer to remain anonymous. He told me that my chance of getting pregnant was less than one per cent.”Ever since her first child was born in 2009, WS has been trying for another.

Future of Asteroid Intercept Mission Depends on Congress

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space.com | Mar 28 @ 08:22

DART is NASA's contribution to an international effort known as the Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA), which is also intended to include a European spacecraft, the Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM). An illustration of ESA's AIM spacecraft, accompanied by two cubesats, observing the collision of NAS's DART spacecraft with a near Earth asteroid. It's also possible, she said, that AIM could fly after the DART mission. THE WOODLANDS, Texas — Plans to continue a NASA mission to intercept a small asteroid will depend on a decision due by the end of April on NASA's 2017 budget, an agency official said March 20. However, at a December ministerial meeting, European Space Agency members elected not to fund AIM, putting that mission in jeopardy.

Playing 'Tetris' After Trauma May Reduce Bad Flashbacks

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livescience.com | Mar 28 @ 08:13

In the "Tetris" group, participants were first asked to recall the accident and briefly tell a researcher about it. Playing 'Tetris' seemed a bit strange at the time, but looking back, it has been a help. According to the authors, one man said, "I think that playing 'Tetris' helped focus my mind and bring some 'normality' back to my head. People in the "Tetris" group experienced nine flashbacks, on average, during the week, compared to 23 flashbacks on average in the control group, the study found. In a previous study, Holmes and colleagues found that playing "Tetris" could reduce intrusive memories in healthy people who had watched a traumatic video.

French Astronaut Thomas Pesquet's Amazing Photos from Space (Gallery)

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space.com | Mar 28 @ 08:01

Relative to Earth's surface, the space station travels at about 17,500 miles per hour (28,200 km/h). These two Soyuz spacecraft, which are docked at Russia's Poisk and Rassvet modules, delivered the current crew of six to the space station. Credit: ESA/NASA`Two Russian Soyuz spacecraft fly over Earth's city lights with star trails overhead in this long-exposure photo taken from the International Space Station. One will return to Earth next month with NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrei Borisenko.

Moon Temple: Art Project Probes Spiritual, Cultural Needs of Lunar Colony

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space.com | Mar 28 @ 08:00

[Visit the Moon Temple: Jorge Mañes Rubio's Lunar Art in Pictures]European Space Agency artist-in-residence Jorge Mañes Rubio. European Space Agency (ESA) artist-in-residence Jorge Mañes Rubio has drawn up plans for a "moon temple" that would help meet the spiritual, social and psychological needs of lunar settlers. Credit: Jorge Mañes Rubio/DITISHOEThe lunar temple would also feature an "oculus" through which people could observe the Earth. (Earth is upside-down because the moon temple would be located at the lunar south pole. "Shackleton Crater, with the moon temple visible as a small bright dot on the left of the image.

Visit the Moon Temple: Artist Jorge Mañes Rubio's Lunar Vision in Images

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space.com | Mar 28 @ 08:00

This image: Shackleton Crater, with Rubio's moon temple visible as a small bright dot on the left of the image. European Space Agency (ESA) artist-in-residence Jorge Mañes Rubio has drawn up plans for a "moon temple" that would help meet the social, spiritual and psychological needs of lunar settlers. See how his vision looks in this gallery.

The Genius of Pinheads: When Little Brains Rule​

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scientificamerican.com | Mar 28 @ 08:00

It holds that smaller creatures will have smaller brains but the ratio of brain-to-body size will actually go up. “But their behavior, as far as we can see, is as sophisticated as things that have relatively large brains. For generations scientists have wondered how intelligent creatures developed large brains to perform complicated tasks. “They should not be able to see.” It seems their tiny brains act as a filter for the image, like night-vision goggles, extracting an image out of the surrounding darkness. “We haven’t yet found any behavioral costs of having a totally tiny brain,” Wcislo says.

After Dino-Killing Asteroid Impact, Life Re-Emerged Quickly

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space.com | Mar 28 @ 07:53

New researcher examines how quickly life recovered following an asteroid impact on Earth about 66 million years ago. "There's life on the seafloor within 30,000 years of the impact," Lowery said during a presentation at the LPSC meeting. THE WOODLANDS, Texas – Life came back surprisingly quickly to the site of the impact that killed the dinosaurs, new research found. The asteroid impact also triggered acid rain and forest fires around the globe, and blasted sulfur and other rock into the air in quantities large enough to block the sun. Because of the different processes involved in the sudden impact extinction event compared to other, more gradual extinctions, scientists were unable to make strong estimates on how quickly life would re-emerge at the impact site, Lowery said.

'Best Man' in Space! Astronaut Brings Friends' Wedding Rings to Space Station

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space.com | Mar 28 @ 07:41

Astronaut Thomas Pesquet brought these wedding rings along for his six-month stay at the International Space Station. French astronaut Thomas Pesquet brought along some very special cargo for his six-month stay at the International Space Station: a shiny, silver pair of wedding rings. After caring for his friends' wedding rings in space for six months, we bet he's planning a toast that is truly out of this world! [See more space photos by astronaut Thomas Pesquet]"In my 1.5 kg 'hand luggage', I brought the wedding rings of my friends getting married this summer! Wedding rings from space, now that's a grand romantic gesture!

Ancient Assyrian Tomb with 10 Skeletons Discovered in Iraq

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livescience.com | Mar 28 @ 07:28

[Photos: Ancient Inscriptions Tell of Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II]A view of the Assyrian tomb and the ceramic sarcophaguses found within it. "More than 40 intact pottery jars were found in the Assyrian tomb. Construction workers accidentally discovered a vaulted tomb dating back to the time of the Assyrian Empire in Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan. Inside the tomb, which was constructed with baked bricks, archaeologists discovered three ceramic sarcophagi holding two skeletons. "During the Assyrian period, these tombs had been built for the elite and rich people," Marf Zamua said.

Sunlit Dunes Snake Across Mars in Gorgeous New NASA Photo

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space.com | Mar 28 @ 07:22

This image by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a field of sand dunes in Mars' southern highlands, just west of the Hellas impact basin. The $720 million Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission launched in August 2005 and arrived at the Red Planet in March 2006. Giant "snakes" of sand slither across the Martian surface in a spectacular new photo by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Sand dunes are common on Mars, a cold and dry planet whose landscape has been shaped heavily by wind. "Other long, narrow linear dunes known as 'seif' dunes are also here and in other locales to the east.

Obese or Not? It's Time to Rethink BMI, Researchers Argue

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livescience.com | Mar 28 @ 03:06

[8 Reasons Our Waistlines Are Expanding]The American Medical Association classifies obesity as a disease, but size alone isn't a disease, Sharma said. Putting BMI in the background would drastically alter the way obesity is handled within the medical system, the researchers said. Meanwhile, some people with BMIs below 30 have health problems that could improve if they lost weight. The surgery is also recommended for those with a BMI of 35 if the patient has serious weight-related health issues. For example, people with a BMI of 30 or above are typically considered obese.

Is This the Anti-Aging Pill We’ve All Been Waiting For?

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technologyreview.com | Mar 28 @ 01:00

Clinically, it’s difficult to prove a drug extends life, as it would take too long. Researchers from Novartis tested everolimus in hundreds of elderly patients in Australia and New Zealand who were about to get a flu vaccine. “It also works at any age, and that makes it interesting.” A study is under way in Seattle to see if rapamycin extends the lives of pet dogs. The drug Novartis tested is a derivative of rapamycin, a compound first discovered oozing from a bacterium native to Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, and named after it. Companies interested in anti-aging medicine include J. Craig Venter’s Human Longevity, In Silico Medicine, Mount Tam Biotechnologies, and the Hong Kong bioinformatics company Gero.

How Water Can Naturally Flow Uphill

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realclearscience.com | Mar 28 @ 00:06

Earth's gravity is strong, but can water ever naturally go against it and flow uphill? Water in a siphon can flow uphill too, as can a puddle of water if it's moving up a dry paper towel dipped in it. This action, called capillary action, allows small volumes of water to flow uphill, against gravity, so long as the water flows through narrow and small spaces. For instance, a wave on a beach can flow uphill, even if it's for just a moment. This alignment and the enormous pressure from the ice sheet above it push the water uphill, Bell said.

Why Opposites Rarely Attract

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realclearscience.com | Mar 27 @ 23:59

If you were brought up on a diet of Disney fairy tales, you might be forgiven for thinking that opposites attract. For decades, psychologists and sociologists have pointed out that the idea that opposites attract is a myth. In fact, one study found that almost 80% of us believe in the idea that opposites attract. In fact, almost all the evidence suggests that opposites very rarely attract. But it’s not just Disney: the idea that opposites attract has completely saturated the film industry – think of the neurotic comedian who falls for the free-spirited singer in Woody Allen’s Annie Hall, for example.

Patients face rising costs for epipen allergy drug

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 27 @ 18:29

Many patients will still have substantial out-of-pocket spending for generic EpiPen because of the cost-sharing their insurance plan requires," said Dr. Chua. Commercially insured patients account for 70 percent of patients who use EpiPen. These pricing practices erode patient and public health. Commercially insured patients who use the life-saving epinephrine auto-injector known as 'EpiPen' have experienced skyrocketing out-of-pocket costs since 2007, according to research published March 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine. "The bottom line is that drug manufacturers and insurers should not force individuals and families to pay high amounts out-of-pocket for life-saving drugs like EpiPen.

A probiotic stress fix

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 27 @ 18:28



The economic case for wind, solar energy in Africa

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 27 @ 18:28



Mouse in the house tells tale of human settlement

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sciencedaily.com | Mar 27 @ 18:28




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